Types of Whiskey

Pot Still whiskey

Single Pot Still whiskey is a style of whiskey unique to Ireland. It used to be known as Pure Pot Still Whiskey and made Ireland world famous for producing whiskey throughout the 19th and early 20th century. By the year 2000, only two brands of Irish Pot Still whiskey remained, Green Spot and Redbreast 12 Year Old. However, in the last few years, new expressions of this uniquely Irish style of whiskey have been released too much international critical acclaim. Single Pot Still Whiskey is always distilled from malted and un-malted barley in copper pot stills. All Single Pot Still whiskey currently commercially available are produced by the Midleton Distillery in Co. Cork, who also triple distil all their whiskeys.

Blended Whiskey

A whiskey that contains two or more types of whiskey, grain, pot still or malt whiskey. Before the Coffey still was invented there were no blended whiskeys. Once the more economic grain spirit became available it was combined with malt or pure pot still whiskey to produce a cheaper, milder drink that found great favour with the consumer. Most whiskey sold today are blended. Jameson, Powers, Black Bush and Kilbeggan are all examples of Irish blended whiskey.


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Grain Whiskey

Grain Whiskey is made in a Coffey Still. It has a much lighter taste than pure pot still or malt whiskey. Grain whiskey is not usually bottled on its own but is instead blended with malt or pure pot still whiskey. There are not many Grain Whiskey’s available, an example of one would be Teeling Single Grain Whiskey.

Malt Whiskey

Irish Single Malt whiskey must be distilled from a mash of nothing other than malted barley at a single distillery.

 


An Important Note

Irish Whiskey must be aged in wooden barrels for a minimum of three years. It must have a minimum of 40% ABV (Alcohol By Volume), and finally the distillation and everything else to do with the production must take place in Ireland.